Tag Archives: ethnic food

My Iftar Under the Allianz Stadium Tent! !!

 

Iftar at the Soccer game

On Wednesday night, Minnesota United Soccer team matched up with the German Bundesliga Hertha Berlin team for the first ever international friendly at Allianz Field. The reservation was made four month ago on line, SeatGeek, which obviously they don’t use the Islamic Colander, so I didn’t know it is going to be in Ramadan. Planning is way overrated however, it was one of the most memorable Iftar I ever had. Watching a game while fasting is not as bad as playing while fasting, If a superstar Egyptian player like Mohamed Saleh who plays for Liverpool is fasting during the game, I can watch the game fasting too. The game starts at 7pm and the Iftar, breaking fast is at 8:35pm, so I need to have a real plan here.

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Surviving Ramadan in America!!

 

How Do you Survive Ramadan in  America

This week, on may 6th, Millions of Muslims around the world started observing the holy  month of Ramadan.  Ramadan is the ninth month of Islamic calendar, that honors the time when god revealed to Prophet Muhammed through Angel Gabriel, the first verses of Quran.   Ramadan is a festive month for Muslims , 30 days of Christmas. Where Muslims  enjoy special traditions and immersed themselves in all night celebration. However, in the political climate of Islamophobic culture , and the rhetoric of  demonizing Muslims and criminalizing Islam.  In America, Muslim faith and practices are questioned and under the spotlight. .  Observing Ramadan traditions, in Islamophobic America needs some adjustments and careful planning and to enjoy these Ramadan traditions and ritual in this tumultuous time without getting themselves in troubles, a Ramadan survival guide needs to be created, here are some unsolicited guideline to consider during some Ramadan traditions!

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My First McVisit … was another American disappointment !!

 

I was born in a small, quite unassuming village resting on the bank of the Egyptian Nile delta. The narrow streets, the mud and windless houses connected like an old stalled cargo train. People’s lifestyles hadn’t changed that much since the time of the pharaohs, and local demographers couldn’t find any dramatic census changes for a long time, around a 1,000 with a slim margin of error.

 

Villagers lived the simple life of a farming community, and their interest in the outside world went only as far as the edge of their corn fields. At dawn, men left with their animals for work and came back at dusk, while their wives stayed home, busy preparing meals and raising kids to work on the farm as soon as they mastered their first steps. Women seemed to consult with the same fashion designer, where their costumes were traditionally made. People went to the same mosque, celebrated the same holidays, and for generations, villagers kept the gene pool very much confined to a singular gene pool!

 

Life for people was a simple one, rhyming with nature, everyone knowing everyone else. The village had one street, one barber shop, one grocery store, one school, one cemetery, and one mosque and everyone ate one kind of cheese; always feta, and always white. Egyptians look at cheese as a live food, and they don’t as a rule throw their cheese away; when it gets old they just give it another name and eat, from Qareesh, Barameely, Creamy, and when it gets rotten they call it, “Mesh” (Yacky Cheese).

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