Why Ahmed got arrested and Malala got a Nobel prize

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Ahmed Mohamed, the young inventor, and Malala Yousafzai, the young women rights advocate, both have a story. However, each story has a different narrative and a different ending. Ahmed and Malala are both Muslims and were both victims of ignorance, bigotry and a self-righteous mindset, and they both became household names. Ahmed was a victim …

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Killing an Arab! … the tragic journey of Aylan Kurdi




Notes from America: Killing an Arab! … the tragic journey of Aylan Kurdi

Killing an Arab!
“Standing on the beach
With a gun in my hand
Staring at the sea
Staring at the sand
Staring down the barrel
At the arab on the ground
I can see his open mouth
But I hear no sound…”

The song for the British band “The Cure” was inspired by Albert Camus’s novel “The Stranger” published 1946,sold millions an it caused a lot of controversy because of its title. ”Killing an Arab. However in Camus’s novel, he was dealing with existentialism, and the title “killing An Arab” was taken to reflect emptiness of life after killing a man on an Algerian beach. This how millions around the world felt after they first saw the photo of the Syrian 3 year old boy Aylan’s lifeless tiny body, washed up on the Turkish beach, his red T-shirt, blue shorts with his small shoes still intake on his tiny feet and his face down rested on the sand. Camus’s book tells the story of senseless killing of an Arab on Algerian beach. It explored what he termed “the nakedness of man faced with the absurd. Now, ” We all that man, we all guilty in the killing of this young boy found on the Turkish beach, his photo explored our nakedness and emptiness in our lives. This single image has captured our attention and kept millions of people very busy on social media and TV networks. The photo of Aylan has stirred public outrage and embarrassed political leaders as far away as Canada; there, the authorities had rejected an asylum application from the boy’s family, humanity was dead on arrival at the landscape of our ambivalence. The photo was like a drop of pain constantly knocking on the roof of our conscious.
These are, of course, not the first photos of suffering to carry this kind of gripping emotive outrage.
One thinks of Nick Ut’s image from 1972 of a naked nine-year-old girl fleeing from an American napalm attack on her village in Vietnam.

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